Booknotes from Literacy-chic

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About 'Booknotes from Literacy-chic' Channel

The continuing journey of a former graduate student reading.

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Outlander Looks Back on American History and Catholicism: Denying the Sacraments...

[...] nonblackened eye widened at sight of me, and he started up with an exclamation of surprise. “Father Kenneth .” I gripped him by the hand and squeezed, smiling broadly for the benefit of whatever [...]

The Question of Literacy in The Hunger Games (Pt. 2): Snow as Literate Dictator

[...] Continued from Pt. 1 So where is literacy in the Hunger Games?  It is clear that the people of Panem are literate.  There is education in all of the [...]

Thoughts on the Grisha Trilogy by Leigh Bardugo (with a note on God in fiction)

[...] that fascinated me that seems to need to be addressed before I can move on--or back--to the Hunger Games article that I've been trying to write since February or March (and then ultimately to Lord of [...]

Four Questions on Writing

[...] , I have, like Damocles' sword, two articles that I would like to write--one on where the Hunger Games novels fit in the history of dystopian discourses on literacy, and one that discusses the [...]

The Question of Literacy in The Hunger Games (Pt. 1)

[...] It's been a while since my Hunger Games posts, but after seeing Catching Fire last night (it was good; go see it!), and after reading [...]

Farmer Maggot's Farm: If not locus amoenus, then what?

[...] rather than in nature.  In particular, there is no running water.  There is also no priest.  Farmer Maggot is a shrewd fellow, but he does not, in fact, preside over the meal.  His wife is more [...]

The Locus Amoenus in Middle Earth: Elvish Spaces

[...] . Reading very specifically with the locus amoenus in mind, I am approaching the farm of Farmer Maggot, with Black Riders on the road--Farmer Maggot is an important personage, and even though his [...]

Language and Race, Nostalgia and Place - Stopping in Hollin/Eregion: A Notable M...

[...] in memory, it does not seem imbued with power the same way that others are--though Farmer Maggot's house is a decent candidate for a locus amœnus.  Tom Bombadil's house is most [...]

"No oath or bond is laid...": A Notable Moment from Fellowship of the Ri...

[...] , and to practice close reading on the web (or at least closer than your average book review!) Notable moments are "rhetorical responses."  They stem from the circumstances of reading--what [...]

Notes Toward an Article on Blogging and Reading

[...] of creative/critical energy this morning, I decided to collect everything I have said about notable moments--on my original class blog, which is private, in a conference presentation I gave, in an [...]

Language and Race, Nostalgia and Place - Stopping in Hollin/Eregion: A Notable M...

[...] It's a funny thing about Notable Moments.  Once I commit one to writing, my mind becomes oriented in that direction--seeking, finding, [...]

Four Questions on Writing

[...] on literacy, and one that discusses the purpose and pedagogy behind what I call "notable moments" posts.  The former, on the Hunger Games, has (I believe) been more or less accepted as [...]

Drums: The Reproductive Feminism of Outlander Pt. 1

[...] ) is the depiction of unrestricted, unprotected sex.  It is perhaps the prominance of the birth control message in the subsequent books that make it seem not only like a backlash against its absence [...]

Drums: The Reproductive Feminism of Outlander Pt. 2

[...] up with fertility, that develops, in later books, into a curious near-feminist statement on birth control and reproduction. The Early Books From the first novel, Outlander, Gabaldon's novels have been [...]

On Authors, Fans, and Audience: Written in My Own Heart's Blood (MOBY - Outlande...

[...] placed in the novel for three purposes:  to disgust the reader, to stress the importance of birth control by depicting the (historical?) dangers of childbirth, and to introduce the ethics of forced [...]

On the Edge of Ruin...: Rereading and what is "Notable."

[...] we will speak also of Tobold the Old and his herb-lore. Farewell!" (545) It is a truly notable moment, and one that could easily be missed in a first reading of Lord of the Rings.  What we have [...]

Tolkien and Nuance: Dwarf as 'Other' in Rohan

[...] that dwarves are particularly strange in Rohan, though their ways are known. This is not the notable moment that inspired me to write, however.  The moment occurs in Helm's Deep--in a chapter that I [...]

"No oath or bond is laid...": A Notable Moment from Fellowship of the Ri...

[...] This is a Notable Moment post, and what I mean by "notable moment" reaches back into my purpose(s?) for keeping up this blog (intermittently):  to give an [...]

Four Questions on Writing

[...] class, I had students keep blogs that would document their reading process. The "notable moment" became more developed in that class, and really enriched our class conversations.  Now [...]

Cruel Reviewer: A Review That is Almost Not a Review

[...] in a well-constructed, coherent volume, since contemporary poets are seldom the subject of literary criticism by non-creative writing professors (unless they draw on their network of friends and [...]

A Bit of a Departure: Triton's Sacrifice in The Little Mermaid

[...] not they would let their sisters, nieces, or daughters watch the film, they said no, literary criticism would have no bearing on their actions.  And yet, they parroted it.  *sigh*  That [...]

Notes Toward an Article on Blogging and Reading

[...] online How it can shape how we read How it can shape the way we teach How it can shape literary criticism Perhaps if I stick to finding articles that can bolster each of these, I will not need to [...]

Language and Race, Nostalgia and Place - Stopping in Hollin/Eregion: A Notable M...

[...] it is an outdated concept; perhaps it is simply foreign to the American tradition of literary criticism, which seems likely, even given the advent of ecocriticism, which purports to root itself [...]

Fiery Cross: Dignity in Suffering

[...] -01). The Fiery Cross (Outlander) (Kindle Locations 2645-2646). Random House Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.  [...]

Outlander Looks Back on American History and Catholicism: Denying the Sacraments...

[...] ! Gabaldon, Diana (2002-10-01). The Fiery Cross (Outlander). Random House Publishing Group. Kindle Edition. [...]

Drums: The Reproductive Feminism of Outlander Pt. 2

[...] ... Gabaldon, Diana (2004-10-26). Dragonfly in Amber (Outlander). Random House, Inc.. Kindle Edition.Gabaldon, Diana (2004-10-26). Drums of Autumn (Outlander). Random House Publishing Group. [...]

Drums: The Reproductive Feminism of Outlander Pt. 1

[...] ). Drums of Autumn (Outlander) (Kindle Locations 10291-10292). Random House Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.  [...]

The Question of Literacy in The Hunger Games (Pt. 3): Scripted or Unscripted?

[...] Fire that introduces the reader to one of the grand literacy themes in the Hunger Games trilogy, which can be best summed up in the question:  scripted or unscripted?  Up to [...]

Four Questions on Writing

[...] related to the Outlander series that I never actually completed, and one or two about the Hunger Games trilogy--not entirely satisfactory, but not completely lost, either.  When I'm reading a paper [...]

The Question of Literacy in The Hunger Games (Pt. 1)

[...] kind of literary criticism I want to do, I want to return to my final commentary on the Hunger Games trilogy. The topic here is literacy, and originally I saved it until last because at first glance, [...]

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Outlander Looks Back on American History and Catholicism: Denying the Sacraments...

[...] nonblackened eye widened at sight of me, and he started up with an exclamation of surprise. “Father Kenneth .” I gripped him by the hand and squeezed, smiling broadly for the benefit of whatever [...]

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